Person With Vision Impairment

Three PVIs in three separate Zoom meeting screens, having an online training session with ongoing discussion.

Before You Start

Hello! Welcome to Smartphone Training for PVI!

Before you start learning how to use the smartphone, you might like to find out more about the accessories that will make using your smartphone more convenient. There is also an explanation of some basic terminologies that will enhance your learning. Our research team is recommending some useful apps for use in Singapore context. You can download the list of apps here.

Guide for Person with Vision Impairment (PVI)

The PDF and Word Doc contain all the topics in this webpage for Person with Vision Impairment.
Download it on your device so that you can view it offline at your convenience.


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Android

Exploring Your Android Device

Video Duration: 4:02 minutes

This video helps you to explore the surface and elements of 2 typical Android Devices in today’s market, that is, the Google Pixel 6 and Samsung Galaxy S22+.


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Exploring Your Android Device

Hi, my name is Hong Sen, I am an IT trainer at Guide Dogs Singapore. Today, I’ll be showing you phones from two different major manufacturers of Android devices, mainly Samsung and Google. Before we begin, I will be walking you through the common elements found on Android devices.

Typically, on an Android phone, you will expect to find a power button, volume buttons, the USB charging port, and perhaps also an earphone jack.

Google Pixel 6
Over here, I have a Google Pixel with the phone’s screen facing me. Let’s start our exploration on the left edge of the phone.

On the left of the phone, it’s mostly bare except for the SIM card slot; you can feel the rectangular outline of it. The top edge of the phone is also bare, except for a microphone pinhole. On right side of the phone, we will expect to find the power button at the top with the volume buttons below that. On the bottom edge of the phone, we will find a slot with a primary microphone behind this slot, the USB-C charging port in the middle, followed by the speaker on the right.

Let’s Now Explore the Front of the Phone
At the top we will find an earpiece slit, which also doubles as a loudspeaker. Underneath that, we will find the front-facing camera, which can’t [be] identified by touch as it is housed under the display glass. At the bottom half of the display, we will find the fingerprint reader, which is use for biometrics purposes.

Now moving to the rear of the device, at the top we will find our cameras, the LED flash, and a microphone pinhole. The rest of the device is bare. But underneath the panel, we’ll expect to find the Near-field communication, or “NFC” antenna, which is use for payment purposes, and reading of NFC tags. We will also find the wireless charging coil, which is used for wireless charging.

Samsung Galaxy S22+
Let’s now move our attention to the Samsung Galaxy S22+. With the phone’s screen facing me, let’s take a look of its components. You will find that the Galaxy S22+ is pretty similar when compared to the Pixel. The left edge of the phone is bare. And on the right edge, at the top we’ll find the volume buttons with the power button below that. In fact, this is the pretty typical layout of most Android phones out there. The rest of the components are also pretty similar. On the rear of the phone, we have the cameras on the top left, with the “NFC” antenna and wireless charging coil housed under the panel as well.

So, these are the Android devices that I’ve showed you today. I hope you found this to be useful. If you would like to get a better understanding of the terminology we used in this video, please refer to “Persons with Vision Impairment” on our website. Once again, my name is Hong Sen, and we will meet again next time.

Contact Our IT Trainers
If you would like to learn more about operating your phone, you can arrange an appointment with our IT trainers at Guide Dogs Singapore by calling 6339 7900 or email us at IT@guidedogs.org.sg.


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Android

Just Basics for Android Devices

Video Duration: 4:28 minutes

This video shows you how to perform some basic functions on an Android phone, such as how to power on and off your phone, adjust the volume levels to your preference, and activate Google Assistant to perform some simple tasks.


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  • This is the Android Accessibility Help page that shows you how to Use the Accessibility Menu to control your Android device (only works on Android 12 and up). From the menu, you can learn how to lock your screen, open Google Assistant, adjust volume and brightness…etc.
  • Click here to learn with Hadley on how to organise your applications and home screen using TalkBack.
  • This is the Google Assistant Help page, with a step-by-step guide to setting up your Google Assistant, which includes selecting the language you desire to use, and choosing how you would like to communicate with Google Assistant, such as ‘Hey Google’ commands and turning on Quick phrases.
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Video Transcript
Just Basics for Android Devices

Hi, my name is Hong Sen, I am an IT trainer at Guide Dogs Singapore. Today, I’ll be showing you how you can perform some basic functions on an Android phone.

Firstly, we will be taking a look at how you can power on and off your Android phone. We will then see how you can adjust the volume levels to your preference. Last but not least, we will see how you can trigger Google Assistant which can help you to perform some simple tasks.

Power On the Pixel Phone
Today, we will be demonstrating on the Google Pixel 6. In one of the previous videos, we have gone through the orientation for the Pixel. You may wish to refer to that for a quick refresher.

To power on the Pixel 6, and almost all other Android devices, press and hold down the ‘Power’ button for about 5 seconds. You should be able to feel a slight vibration feedback.
Let’s now give that a try.

[Demo: Hong Sen power on the phone by holding down the ‘Power’ button for about 5 seconds.]

I have felt the vibration feedback, and the Pixel is now powering on. This should take about 20 - 30 seconds. TalkBack will start talking once the Pixel has booted up as we have enabled that previously.

Adjust Volume
The Pixel has now powered up. Let’s now explore how we can adjust the volume of the phone. The volume up button increases the volume, and the volume down button decreases the volume. This will affect any media that is currently playing, or if you are in a call, this will adjust the call volume.

To adjust TalkBack’s volume, touch anywhere on the screen with one finger while pressing the volume buttons. Let’s now give that a try.
[Demo: Hong Sen uses his left hand with one finger to touch the phone screen, then follow by using his right hand to press the volume buttons to adjust the volume of TalkBack. TalkBack reads out accordingly, volume increases when Hong Sen presses the volume up button, then volume decreases when Hong Sen presses the volume down button.]

Activate Google Assistant (Virtual Assistant)
Alright, that’s how you adjust volume on your Android device.

Let’s now take a look at Google Assistant. Google Assistant is a virtual assistant that allows you to use spoken commands to perform some simple tasks, such as asking questions, turning on and off features of the phone, etc. To bring up Google Assistant, press and hold the ‘Power’ button. Let’s now give that a try.

[Demo: Hong Sen pressing the ‘Power’ button, to bring up Google Assistant. TalkBack talks when Google Assistant is activated.]

Let’s try some simple commands.

[Demo: Hong Sen taps on ‘Assistant Microphone’ and asks a question – “What’s the time?”. Then Google Assistant tells out the time. Hong Sen continues asking the second question – “How’s the weather?”, then Google Assistant replies accordingly.]

Let’s now try to use Google Assistant to turn off TalkBack.

[Demo: Hong Sen taps on ‘Assistant Microphone’ and says – “Turn off TalkBack”. Then Google Assistant says, “TalkBack off”.]

So, this is how Google Assistant works.
Another way to trigger Google Assistant is to say ‘OK, Google’ or ‘Hey Google’ command. This needs to be set up during the setup process of the phone, or in ‘Assistant’ app.

So, these are the basic functionalities of an Android phone. We have seen how an Android phone can be powered on and off, how to adjust volume levels, and how to trigger Google Assistant. I hope you found this to be useful. Once again, my name is Hong Sen, and we’ll meet again next time.

If you would like to learn more about operating your phone, you can contact our IT trainers at Guide Dogs Singapore by calling us at 6339 7900 or emailing us at IT@guidedogs.org.sg.


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Android

Screen Display Settings for Android Devices

Video Duration: 10:08 minutes

This video shows you how to configure some basic screen display settings to fit your visual needs, such as adjusting font size, colour inversion, and high contrast. Then followed by showing you how to use the magnification tool as well as to set up shortcuts for ease of access on your Android phone.


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Screen Display Settings for Android Devices

Hi, I’m Dallon, I am an IT trainer at Guide Dogs Singapore. Today, I will walk you through some of the built-in accessibility features found on your Android phone to aid persons with low vision.

Firstly, we will look at how to configure the screen display settings, such as adjusting font size, colour inversion, and high contrast. Then, we’ll explain some of the settings and shortcuts for ease of access. Finally, we’ll cover how to use magnification tool on Android.

Today we will be using the Sony Xperia 10 IV for demonstration. To start off, let’s locate ‘Settings’. For today’s demonstration, I’ll show you the fastest way to go to the ‘Settings’, which is through ‘Quick Settings’ under ‘Notification Shade’. So let’s see that in action. First, I will unlock my phone.

[Demo: Dallon unlocks the phone.]

And then from the very top, swipe one finger downwards.

[Demo: Dallon uses one finger to swipe down from the very top of the phone screen, and ‘Notification Shade’ appears.]

This is ‘Notification Shade’.

To review ‘Quick Settings’, from the very top swipe down with one finger.

[Demo: Dallon uses one finger to swipe down from the very top of the phone screen, the ‘Quick Settings’ page is in view.]

And ‘Settings’ icons can be found at the bottom part of the phone screen for this model of the phone. Do note for other models, or other Android phones, you may find it at the top right, or you may not even find it at all. For that kind of scenario, you may have to locate ‘Settings’ manually.

To locate ‘Settings’ manually, go back to your ‘Home Screen’, pull out the app list by swiping up with one finger, and then locate ‘Settings’. For phones like Oppo, you may have to locate it right at the ‘Home Screen’. There is no app list for Oppo’s phones.

Configure Accessibility Features
Now let’s tap on the ‘Settings’ icon to open up ‘Settings’.

[Demo: Dallon taps on the ‘Settings’ icon to open up ‘Settings’.]

In today’s video, we want to focus on the Accessibility Features that Android has to offer, so we have to scroll down to look for ‘Accessibility’.

[Demo: Dallon scrolls down the page to locate ‘Accessibility’, taps on it to enter into the ‘Accessibility’ page.]

Then, since we are focusing on display and making things easier for you to see, we will be looking at the “Display’ section, which is right here. In the ‘Display’ section under ‘Accessibility’, we can find features like ‘Magnification’, ‘Colour Inversion’, and ‘Display Size and Text’.

Visual Enhancement Features
Let’s first explore the ‘Display Size and Text’ section.
[Demo: Dallon locates ‘Display Size and Text’ section on his phone.]

In ‘Display Size and Text’ section, you can adjust the font size, to make text larger, you can also adjust the display size to make icons easier to see. In addition, you can bold text, and you can turn on high contrast so that your text will be sharper, and have better contrast. Do note that you have to play around with the ‘Settings’ to see what works best for you. To increase the font size, you will find the slider right below the text ‘Font Size’, just drag it to the right,
[Demo: Dallon drags slider to the right, text font size increases accordingly.]

and you will see the size would have increased in the preview window on the top half of the phone screen. To increase the display size to make items on screen easier to see, similarly, you will find a slider right under the text ‘Display Size’, drag it towards the right,
[Demo: Dallon drags the slider to the right, display size increases accordingly.]

and in the preview screen, you notice that the text will become bigger, and if you go back to the ‘Home Screen’,
[Demo: Dallon taps the ‘Home’ button to go back to the ‘Home Screen’.]

you will see that your icons have gradually increased in size, and the text will become bigger as well.

Another feature that I would like to demonstrate today is ‘High Contrast’. So to turn on ‘High Contrast’, you will find a toggle on the right-hand side of the text ‘High Contrast’, just tap on the toggle,
[Demo: Dallon taps on the toggle of ‘High Contrast’.]

and you notice that your text will become sharper. Similarly, if you want to turn on ‘Bold Text’, you will find a toggle on the right side of the text ‘Bold Text’, tap on it,
[Demo: Dallon taps on the toggle of ‘Bold Text’, then the text becomes bolded.]

you noticed that the text will stand out even more.

Dark Theme and Colour Inversion
The next list of visual enhancement features we will be looking at is ‘Colour Inversion’ and ‘Dark Theme’. These could be found under ‘Settings’, ‘Accessibility’. And for newer version of Android, such as Android 13, you can find it in the section called, ‘Colour and Motion’. From where we are now, we have to go back one level, to get back to ‘Accessibility’,
[Demo: Dallon taps the ‘Back’ button on the top left and returns to the ‘Accessibility’ page.]

you can either tap on the ‘Back’ button at the top left, or, the ‘Back’ button in the Navigation Bar.
Now let’s tap on ‘Colour and Motion’.

[Demo: Dallon taps on ‘Colour and Motion’ to enter the page.]

Noticed that my ‘Dark Theme’ is currently enabled. With ‘Dark Theme’ enabled, you will see a black background and white text. When this is turned on, it will affect all native apps, and some supported apps, like WhatsApp.

To enable or disable ‘Dark Theme’, you’ll first have to locate ‘Dark Theme’, and you will find a toggle right beside it. In this case, we are going to disable ‘Dark Theme’, and to do that, you just need to tap on the toggle once,
[Demo: Dallon taps on the toggle beside ‘Dark Theme’, and the background colour changes.]

notice that my background has become white in colour and the text black in colour. This means the ‘Dark Theme’ has been disabled.

In some applications, where ‘Dark Theme’ is not supported, you can use this accessibility feature called, ‘Colour Inversion’. This will help you to change the background to a darker background and a lighter text. To enable ‘Colour Inversion’, firstly, we have to tap on ‘Colour Inversion’,
[Demo: Dallon taps on ‘Colour Inversion’ to enter the page.]

and then, locate for toggle right beside the text ‘Use Colour Inversion’, let's see what happens when you turn it on.

[Demo: Dallon taps on the toggle of ‘Use Colour Inversion’, screen background colour changes.]

Okay, so noticed that the background become dark, and we have lighter text. Now, if were you to turn it off, it will go back to what it was.

[Demo: Dallon taps on the toggle of ‘Use Colour Inversion’ again to turn it off, background colour changes back to what it was.]

Magnification Tool – Magnification
The next accessibility feature that we will be looking at is a tool called, ‘Magnification’. This tool helps you to magnify items on your screen.

In today’s demonstration, I have set the text size back to default, so that you can see the full effects of magnification. To locate ‘Magnification’, go to ‘Settings’, then ‘Accessibility’, and under the ‘Display’ section you will see ‘Magnification’. Let’s tap on it to review the ‘Settings’.

[Demo: Dallon taps on ‘Magnification’ and enters the page.]

You will notice a toggle right beside the text, ‘Magnification Shortcut’, and it’s currently turned on.

The method of shortcuts that I currently use is the ‘Accessibility’ button. You can find it either at the bottom right-hand side of the Navigation Bar of your phone, or it could be floating somewhere on your screen.

Use of Accessibility Shortcut for Magnifier
Since the shortcut has been set to use as ‘Accessibility’ button, to activate ‘Magnifier’ we just need to tap on the ‘Accessibility’ button. So when I tap on the ‘Accessibility’ button, you will notice an orange border around it.

[Demo: Dallon taps on the ‘Accessibility’ button, and an orange border appears around the screen.]

To magnify the screen, simply tap any part of the screen with one finger.

[Demo: Dallon taps on the screen with one finger, items on the screen are magnified.]

Notice that my screen is currently magnified. To review more information on the screen, you need to move the magnification window. To do that, simply tap on the screen with two fingers and drag it around.

To review more information on the top of the screen simply tap with two fingers on the screen and drag downwards.

[Demo: Dallon uses two fingers to tap on the screen and drags downwards, the screen scrolls down with more information in view.]

To review more information at the bottom part of the screen, simply take two fingers, tap down, and drag upwards.

[Demo: Dallon uses two fingers to tap on the screen and drags upwards, the screen scrolling up with more information in view.]

To change the magnification size, you’ll perform a pinch gesture with two fingers. To increase the size, simply put two fingers on the screen and pinch outwards.

[Demo: Dallon puts two fingers on the screen to perform a pinch gesture to pinch outwards, text size increases on the screen]

To decrease the magnification size, simply place two fingers on the screen, and pinch inwards.

[Demo: Dallon puts two fingers on the screen to perform a pinch gesture to pinch inwards, text size decreases on the screen]

To deactivate ‘Magnification’, simply tap the ‘Accessibility’ button, right at the navigation bar, or floating around on your screen.

Configuring Accessibility Shortcuts
Finally, let’s talk about configuring accessibility shortcuts. Accessibility shortcuts allow you to enable or disable some of the frequently used accessibility features.

Generally, in each of the accessibility features, you can find a toggle, to toggle on and off the accessibility shortcut. Right beside the shortcut toggle, to turn it on and off, you will see a text, for instance, ‘Magnification Shortcut’. When we tap on it,
[Demo: Dallon taps on the toggle.]

you’ll notice that you can select the two different methods to activate the shortcut. So, you have, the ‘Accessibility’ button, and by pressing the volume up and down keys. Notice that Magnification has ‘Accessibility’ button set as its shortcut.

So we have looked at how to configure some of the visual enhancement features to fit your needs, explaining some of the settings, and shortcuts for ease of access. Finally, we have covered how to use ‘Magnification’, which is a tool to magnify items on your screen. I hope you’ve found this video to be useful. Once again, I’m Dallon, thanks for listening, and I’ll see you next time.

If you would like to learn more about operating your phone, you can arrange an appointment with our IT trainers at Guide Dogs Singapore by calling 6339 7900, or email us at IT@guidedogs.org.sg.


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Android

Basic Gestures for Android Devices with TalkBack

Video Duration: 7:08 minutes

This video showing you how to use three basic set of finger gestures to operate your Android device with Talkback enabled.


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Basic Gestures for Android Devices with TalkBack

Hi, my name is Hong Sen, I am an IT trainer at Guide Dogs Singapore. Today I’ll be showing you how you can use different finger gestures to operate your Android phone or tablet with Talkback.

Using your fingers, these gestures allow you to navigate through items on screen, scroll, and activating items on the screen.

We will be taking a look in three different gestures today. Mainly, one finger swipe left or right, two fingers scroll, and double tap.

Activating and Using TalkBack
Over here, we have a Google Pixel 6 which we will be demonstrating on today. Before we start on our finger gestures, let’s enable TalkBack. The universal way to enable TalkBack would be to hold down the volume up and down buttons for about two to five seconds. And you should hear a notification tone along with haptic feedback.
[TalkBack reading: TalkBack on, Home, Monday November 28]

So now we have TalkBack enabled. On some devices, you might have to repeat that gestures a second time for TalkBack to be enabled. However, if these gestures does not work, you might need to get sighted assistance to enabled TalkBack. Go to your phone Settings, Accessibility, and you should see a option called “TalkBack”. Tap on that, and tap on the switch to have TalkBack enabled.
Now that we have TalkBack enabled, let’s get start on our finger gestures.

Exploring by Touch
Now before we start talking about finger gestures, TalkBack has a feature called “Explore-by-Touch”. What it does is it reads out what is underneath your finger as you explore the screen with one finger.
[TalkBack reading as his finger moves on]

If we move our finger up to the top left of the phone where the notification bar is, we will hear TalkBack reading our time.
[TalkBack reading: 5:37pm…window…]

Moving right of the notification bar we will hear our battery level,
[TalkBack reading: Battery 64%]
and this is our phone’s current battery level.

Swipe Gestures
Let us now move on to our first gesture – swiping left or right with one finger to navigate through items on screen. To perform a swipe right, simply use one finger to quickly flick right on screen. Let’s give that a try.
[DEMO: One finger swipe to the right. TalkBack reads out “Messages”] Let’s try that again.
We will now perform a swipe right by quickly flicking our finger right on screen with one finger.
[DEMO: One finger swipe to the right. TalkBack reads out “Chrome”]
And now we have moved on to the next app on the screen. We have now learn how to move to the next item. But how do you move back? To do so, quickly flick your finger left with one finger on the screen. Let’s give that a try.
[DEMO: One finger swipe to the left. TalkBack reads out “Messages”]

Now we have moved back to the previous item on the screen. Let’s try that again.
[DEMO: One finger swipe to the left. TalkBack reads out “Phone”]
And we are back on the first app that we started on previously.

Scroll Gestures
Let’s now move on to our next gesture, the scroll gesture. You may want to perform a scroll gesture to move to a different page on screen, or to reveal more information. To do so, use two fingers to swipe left, right, up or down on the screen.
For instance, if I would like to move to the next page on my home screen, I will now perform a two fingers swipe from right to left on the screen.
[DEMO: TalkBack reads “Home”, two fingers swipe left to right, TalkBack reads “home screen 2 of 2”]
Now, to move back to our previous page, I will perform a reverse gesture, swiping with two fingers from left to right on the screen.
[DEMO: Two finger swipe from left to right, TalkBack reads “home screen 1 of 2”]

You can also perform a scroll up or down in certain scenarios to reveal more information. For instance, if I were to do a two fingers scroll up now, by sliding two fingers from the bottom edge of the phone up, we will see a list of apps.
[DEMO: Scroll up with two fingers from bottom edge of the phone, TalkBack reads “apps suggestion, search your phone and more…”]

To scroll up or down through this list, we can perform the same gesture of swiping up with two fingers,
[DEMO: Swiping up with two fingers, TalkBack reads out “Home”]
to move down this list of apps. To move back up through this list of apps, we’ll perform the reverse gesture of using two fingers to swipe down.
[DEMO: Swiping down with two fingers, TalkBack reads out “apps suggestion”]
And now we are at the top of this list of apps.

Double Tap Gestures
The last gesture that we’ll be looking at today is the “Double tap” gesture. The “Double tap” gesture allows you to activate the current item in focus with TalkBack. To perform this gesture, use one finger to quickly tap twice on the screen. Let’s give this a try. We will first find an icon of an app that we would like to open.
[DEMO: Touching the Phone app, Talkback reads “Phone, window home, double tap to activate”]

Now let’s give that gesture a try. Quickly tap twice on the screen with one finger.
[DEMO: One finger double-tap on screen, TalkBack reads “Phone, folder…”]

We now have our Phone app open. Let’s give that gesture a try again. We shall now look at the key pad option to open the key pad to dial a number.
[DEMO: Touch keypad icon on screen (bottom right of the phone interface), TalkBack reads “key pad, button, dialling list…double tap to activate”. Double tap. TalkBack reads “selected”]
And we have successfully opened our dial pad.

These are the three main gestures we have covered today – one finger swipe left and right, two fingers scroll, and activating item with a double tap.
Once again, My name is Hong Sen and we will meet again next time.

Contact Our IT Trainers
If you would like to learn more about operating your phone, you can arrange an appointment with our IT trainers at Guide Dogs Singapore by calling 6339 7900 or email us at IT@guidedogs.org.sg.


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Android » Calling & Messaging

Adding Contact and Sending Text Messages Using the Contact List (Android Device)

Video Duration: 6:19 minutes

This video will first show you how to add a contact and send a text message using the contact list on Android device with “Talkback enabled”.

Part of Android Calling & Messaging series


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Adding Contact and Sending Text Messages Using the Contact List (Android Device)

Hi, my name is Hong Sen, I am an IT trainer at Guide Dogs Singapore. Today, I’ll be showing you how to make use of your Contacts list in Android phone with Talkback enabled. We will start off with adding a new contact to your contacts list, accessing the contacts list, where you can perform functions such as sending a message or calling a contact.

Access the Phone’s Contacts
We will be demonstrating on a Google Pixel 6. There are two ways to access the phone’s contacts. The first is by the phone’s “Contacts” app, and the second is through the “Phone” app itself. We will be demonstrating the latter.

[Demo: Show phone with “Phone” app opened]
Over here, we have our “Phone” app opened. To access the phone’s contact list, we will find the “Contacts” icon at the bottom of the screen, on the tab bar.

[Demo: Touch “Contacts” icon, Talkback reads “Contacts tab”]
We have found the “Contacts” icon, let’s now perform the double-tap gesture.
[Demo: Double tap on “Contacts” icon, phone switch to “Contacts” tab, or page.]
We have now switch to the phone’s “Contacts” tab, or page.

Adding a New Contact
Let’s now try to add a contact.
With the swipe gesture or explore-by touch, you can find the “Create New Contact” button near the top of the screen.

[Demo: Touch “Create New Contact” and Talkback reads accordingly]
Let’s double tap this.
[Phone switches to “Contact Creation” screen, Talkback announce “Create Contact”]

We are now on the “Contact Creation” screen. On this screen, there are fields for us to fill in information such as First Name, Last Name, and “Contact Number”. Minimally, we will need to fill in the “First Name” and “Contact Number” fields.
Let’s now try to fill in the “First Name” and “Contact Number” fields.
I will now locate the “First Name” field.
[Demo: Find “First Name”, then double-tap, keyboard appears]

To type on the keyboard, use one finger to explore lower half of the screen, and the letters will be read out to you. Once you find the letter you wish to enter, lift your finger. Let’s try that.
[Demo: Entering a “First Name” with TalkBack announcing the letters.]

I have now entered the “First Name”. Let’s now enter the “Phone Number”. With one finger, touch the middle of the screen. With explore-by-touch or the swipe gesture, you will be able to find the “Phone Number” field.
[Demo: Finding the “Phone Number” field with swiping gesture.]

I have found the field, let’s open this by double-tapping.
[Demo: Double-tapping the “Phone Number” field, phone-style keypad appears.]

Now, the keyboard has been replaced by the phone-style keypad. I’ll now enter a number.
[Demo: Entering a number, TalkBack announcing the number accordingly.]
Now, let’s save this number to our contact list. Using explore-by-touch or the one finger swipe gesture, we can find the “Save” button, near the top right corner of the screen.
[Demo: Finding the “Save” button using explore-by-touch.]
And I now double tap.
[Demo: Talkback announcing, “Save Contact”.]

Access the Contact List and Sending a Text Message
Now, the contact has been successfully added to the Contact List. And we are now back on the “Contacts List” screen.
Over here, you can access contacts stored on your phone by using explore-by-touch or the one-finger swipe gesture.
[Demo: Using explore-by-touch and one-finger swipe gesture to access the contacts stored on the phone.] You can also use a two-fingers scroll gesture to scroll through longer lists.

There’s also a search function, located near the top of the screen, which you can use to search for a specific contact. I’ll let you explore that on your own.
For now, let’s try to find a contact on the screen.
[Demo: Fining a contact using explore-by-touch, TalkBack reading out the contacts accordingly. Found the contact “Aaron GDS”, then double-tap it.]

Here, we have different options such as “Calling” and “Texting”.
To do so, use the explore-by-touch or one finger swipe gesture to locate one of these options, and double-tap.
Let’s now try to send a text to this contact.

[Demo: Using explore-by-touch to locate the number, and one finger swipe to search for “Text Message”. Locate “Editbox” and double tap. Keypad appears. Key in a message using explore-by touch. After keying message, locate the “Send” button and then double tap it to send the message.]

And we have now sent a text to this contact.

So, we have taken a look at Contacts in Android, I hope this has been helpful. Once again, my name is Hong Sen. And we will meet again next time.

If you would like to learn more about operating your phone, you can contact our IT trainers at Guide Dogs Singapore by calling us at 6339 7900, or emailing us at IT@guidedogs.org.sg.


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Android » Calling & Messaging

Make and Receive Phone Calls (Android Device)

Video Duration: 5:02 minutes

This video will first show you how to answer and end calls on Android device with Talkback enabled, then followed by making a call by dialing a number with the phone’s “Dialpad”.

Part of Android Calling & Messaging series


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Make and Receive Phone Calls (Android Device)

Hi, my name is Hong Sen, I am an IT trainer at Guide Dogs Singapore.
Today, I’ll be showing you how you can make and receive phone calls on Android with Talkback enabled.

We will first try to answer and end calls with Talkback, followed by making a call by dialling a number with the phone’s “Dialpad”.

Answering and Ending a Call with ‘Talkback’
Today, we will be demonstrating on a Google Pixel 6.
We will first look at how you can answer and end calls with Talkback enabled. With Talkback enabled, the simplest way to answered and end phone calls would be to perform a two-fingers double gesture. This gesture should work on Samsung Galaxies and Google Pixels running Android 11 and above, or any Android devices running Android 12 and above.
Over here, our Google Pixel 6 is running Android 13. We will be receiving a phone call shortly.

[Demo: Google Pixel 6 screen shows an incoming call, Talkback announcing an incoming call from “Hong Sen Work”]

To answer the call, we shall perform a two-fingers double-tap gesture.

[Demo: Hong Sen performs a two-fingers double-tap gesture on the phone and phone call is answered]

And we have answered a call. Now, to end the call, we will perform the same gesture, two-fingers double-tap.

[Demo: Hong Sen performs a two-fingers double-tap gesture, and the call has ended.]

And the call has ended.

Making a Phone Call through “Dialpad” (Keypad)
We have successfully answered and ended a call using the Talkback gesture, double-tap with two-fingers. Let’s now try to make a phone call using a “Keypad”.
Over here, we have the phone’s default “Phone” app opened.
[Phone screen displaying “Phone” app opened]

Please note that depending on your phone’s model, the layout of the “Phone” app might be different.

We will now bring out the phone’s “Dialpad”, or “Keypad”, by finding the icon at the bottom right corner of the screen.

[Demo: Hong Sen moves his finger around to search for the “Keypad” icon, Talkback reads out accordingly until “Keypad” icon is found.]

I’ll now perform a double-tap gesture.

[Demo: Hong Sen performs a double-tap gesture on “Keypad” icon, then “Keypad” opens]

The “Keypad” resembles that of a “Dialpad” on a landline telephone, with the numbers laid out in a matrix of three columns and four rows, with 1-2-3 on the first row, 4-5-6 on the second row, etc.

Notice that above the “Keypad”, you’ll find a textbox, that displayed the numbers dialed, to the right of that, you will find the “Delete” button. And underneath the “Zero” button, you will find the “Dial” button.

Let’s now try to dial a number.

[Demo: Hong Sen dialling number, Talkback reads out the dialled numbers.]

Now we have entered a number, let’s make sure the number is entered correctly. I’ll now touch the “Editbox” above the “Keypad”.

[Demo: Hong Sen touches the “Editbox” and Talkback reads out the numbers]

The number sounds correct, let’s now dial the number. I’ll find the “Dial” button.

[Demo: Hong Sen touch the “Dial” button, Talkback reads out accordingly]

Here’s the “Dial” button, I’ll now perform the double-tap gesture.
[Demo: Hong Sen performs a double-tap gesture on phone and makes a phone call, Talkback announce accordingly, phone ringing…]

And our call has gone through.

Now, let’s try to end the call. Again, to end the call, we will perform the two-fingers double-tap gesture.

[Demo: Hong Sen performs a two-fingers double-tap gesture to end the call, Talkback announce accordingly.]

And our call has ended.

So, we have seen how you can make and receive phone calls on Android with Talkback enabled. Another popular way to make phone calls is via WhatsApp, which we will cover in the next phase. In the meantime, if you require assistance with WhatsApp, please feel free to reach out to GDS for support. Once again, my name is Hong Sen, and we will meet again next time.

If you would like to learn more about operating your phone, you can contact our IT trainers in Guide Dogs Singapore by calling us at 6339 7900, or emailing us at IT@guidedogs.org.sg.


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Android » Calling & Messaging

Sending and Receiving Messages (Android Device)

Video Duration: 4:49 minutes

This video will first show you how to send and receive messages on Android device with Talkback enabled. The video will first show you how to browse through and read messages with the default ‘Messages’ app, and then followed by sending a text message.

Part of Android Calling & Messaging series


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Sending and Receiving Messages (Android Device)

Hi, my name is Hong Sen, I am an IT trainer at Guide Dogs Singapore. Today, I’ll be showing you how you can send and read messages with TalkBack on Android.

Reading Messages on a Default ‘Messages’ App
Today, we will be demonstrating on a Google Pixel 6 with the default messaging app. Over here, we have the ‘Messages’ app opened.

[Demo: Hong Sen shows the phone with the ‘Messages’ app opened]

At the top of the screen, there is a search field where you can search for messages that you have sent or received.

[Demo: Hong Sen shows the top of the phone screen.]
Below that, you will find the main messages list, where you can view your message history, displayed as message threads of people you have been texting with. At the bottom right corner of the screen, or if you were to use the swipe gesture, you will find the ‘Start Chat’ button, where you can start a new conversation.

[Demo: Hong Sen shows the bottom right corner of the screen, taps on it, and TalkBack reads out the ‘Start Chat’ button.]

Let’s now browse through the messages on this phone.

[Demo: Hong Sen browses through messages on the phone with TalkBack using the one-finger swipe gesture.]

Let’s take a look at this thread.

[Demo: Hong Sen taps and opens the chat thread and uses one finger swipe gesture to read chat history with GDA. TalkBack reads out chat history accordingly.]

On this page, we’ll have our chat history with GDA. At the top of the screen, we will find the name, below that, we’ll have the list of messages, and at the bottom of the screen, we’ll have the text message ‘EditBox’, where we can type a reply. To the right of that, you will find the ‘Send’ button, amongst other things. You can use the swipe gestures to navigate through this screen, just like any other screen.

Sending Messages on a Default ‘Messages’ App
You have now learned how to read messages with TalkBack. To reply, double-tap on the ‘EditBox’ at the bottom of the screen. Once done, find the ‘Send’ button to the right of the ‘EditBox’.

For now, I will show you how to send a text message to a new contact instead, the steps are similar. On the main screen, you can find the ‘Start Chat’ button at the bottom right corner of the screen. Alternatively, you can use the swipe gestures. Once you find it, double-tap to open. Let’s give that a try.

[Demo: Hong Sen locates the ‘Start Chat’ button, then double taps to open, keypad appears.]

The first ‘Edit Box’ allows you to enter name of your contact or a phone number whom you wish to chat with. I’m going to enter a phone number now.
[Demo: Hong Sen enters a phone number, and TalkBack reads out the numbers accordingly.]

I have now entered a number; I’ll now find the ‘Done’ button at the bottom right of the keyboard.

[Demo: Hong Sen locates the ‘Done’ button. TalkBack reads out the phone number that was just keyed in. Hong Sen taps on the ‘EditBox’.]

Now, TalkBack focuses on the ‘Edit Box’ where I can type a short message.
I will now type a short message.

[Demo: Hong Sen types a short message, and TalkBack reads out what is being typed.]

To send this message, find the ‘Send’ button to the right of the ‘Edit Box’.

[Demo: Hong Sen locates the ‘Send’ button, and double taps it to send the message.]

And now the message has been sent.

So we’ve now learned how you can send and read messages with the default ‘Messages’ app on Android with TalkBack. Another popular way of instant messaging is via WhatsApp, which we will be covered in the next phase. In the meantime, if you require assistance with WhatsApp, please feel free to reach out to GDS for support. Once again, my name is Hong Sen, and we will meet again next time.

If you would like to learn more about operating your phone, you can contact our IT trainers in Guide Dogs Singapore by calling us at 6339 7900 or emailing us at IT@guidedogs.org.sg.


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iOS

Exploring Your iPhone

Video Duration: 7:36 minutes

This video helps you to explore the surface and elements of 2 model of iPhones in today’s market, that is, the iPhone SE (3rd Generation) and iPhone 13.


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Exploring your iPhone

Hi, I’m Dallon, I am an IT trainer of Guide Dogs Singapore.
Today, I will be showing you two different iPhone models. The first iPhone model is the iPhone SE (3rd generation) and the second iPhone model is the iPhone 13.

Here are some common elements found on an iPhone. Firstly, we have the power button, also known as the side button. And then we have the volume buttons, and the lightning connector, or lightning port for charging. One major difference between the iPhone SE and the iPhone 13 is that the iPhone SE has a physical home button at the bottom. Whereas the iPhone 13 does not. Nevertheless, the functions perform are similar.

iPhone SE (3rd Generation)
Right here, we have the iPhone SE (3rd Generation) with the phone screen facing me. We can start by exploring the phone, starting from the top left of the phone. So we move our finger downwards, and the first thing we encounter is a switch. This is a ringer mode switch, push backward for silent mode, to mute it. If you push forward, it will unmute the phone.

Moving downwards, there are volume buttons, volume up is the first button, and the second button is volume down. As you continue to move down, you notice that the rest of the left side of the phone is bare. Now, we move to the top part of the phone, and we notice that it’s completely bare.

Now moving on to the right side of the phone, as we move our finger down, we will find a power button, this is also known as a side button. And as we continue to move down, we find a SIM card tray. So this is where you put in your SIM card. And as we continue to move downwards, we notice the right side is bare.

Now moving on to the bottom of the phone, we will find the speaker, and as we continue to move to the left, we will find a charging port in the middle. As we continue to move, we will find the microphone, and this is where the sound is being picked up. So for the charging port, it is also known as a lightning connector. It uses to charge your phone. And it also doubles up as an audio jack if you use wired headphones.

Okay, so let’s explore the front face of the device. Starting from the middle of the screen, as we move upwards, we will find that there is an earpiece slit, it also doubles as a phone speaker, and on the left of it, we will find a front-facing camera. Moving down all the way to the bottom, we will find a home button, which is a circular button, it also doubles up as a fingerprint reader for biometrics purposes. On iPhone, this is known as Touch ID.

Now moving on to the rear part of the device, starting from the top left, we will find a bump, this is the camera. And right beside it, we will find an LED flashlight and a microphone pinhole. And when we continue to move our finger around, at the back of the phone, we notice that there is nothing there. But underneath the rear panel, there is the Near-field communication antenna, which is known as “NFC”, which is used for payment purposes or scanning other NFC tags. There is also a wireless charging coil, which is for charging your iPhone wirelessly.

iPhone 13
Moving on to the second model, we have the iPhone 13 with the phone screen facing me. Now it has some similarities compared to the iPhone SE (3rd generation) but has some differences as well. So let’s start off a gain at the left side of the phone, moving down you will find the mute/ unmute switch or the ringer mode switch.

Continue moving down we will find volume buttons, and as we move down, we will find, there is a SIM card tray. Proceeding to the top of the phone, we will notice that it’s completely bare. Moving on to the right side of the phone, we will find the power button. And continue moving down all the way to the bottom side of the phone, we will find, on the right side there is the speaker, in the middle we have the charging port, and on the left side, we have the microphone.

The rest of the components will be pretty similar to the iPhone SE. So from the front face of the device when we move upwards, we won’t identify this by touch, but there’s the earpiece slit and the front-facing camera at the top part. And as we move downwards, the difference comes where we notice that there is no home button. So in order to go back home we will use gestures instead.

Moving on to the rear of the device, we will start top left again, and we will find two bumps, so now there are two cameras, and, there is also the LED flash, and the microphone pinhole. Underneath the rear panel of the phone, we also have the NFC antenna and the wireless charging coil. This is similar to the iPhone SE that we have explored just now, and it is common throughout most of the phones these days.

So these are the two iPhone models we have covered. I hope you have found this video useful. If you would like to get a better understanding of the terminology used in this video, feel free to refer to “Persons with Vision Impairment” on our website for more information. Once again, I am Dallon, thanks for listening, and I’ll see you next time!

Contact Our IT Trainers
If you would like to learn more about operating your phone, you can arrange an appointment with our IT trainers at Guide Dogs Singapore by calling 6339 7900 or email us at IT@guidedogs.org.sg.


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iOS

Just Basics for iOS Devices

Video Duration: 4:19 minutes

This video showing you how to perform some basic functions on an iPhone, such as how to power on and off your phone, adjust the volume levels to your preference, and to activate Siri to perform some simple tasks.


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Just Basics for iOS Devices

Hi, my name is Hong Sen, I am an IT trainer at Guide Dogs Singapore. Today, I’ll be showing you how you can perform some basic functions on an iPhone.

Firstly, we will take a look at how you can power on and off your iPhone. We will then see how you can adjust the volume levels to your preference. Last but not least, we will try activating Siri, which can help you to perform some simple tasks.

Today, we will be demonstrating on an iPhone 13.
In one of our previous videos, we went through the orientation for the iPhone. You may wish to refer to that if you need a quick refresher.

Power On an iPhone
To power on the iPhone, press and hold the ‘Power’ button for about 5 seconds. The Apple logo should appear on the screen.
Let’s try that now.

[Demo: Hong Sen presses and holds the ‘Power’ button to power on the iPhone. Apple logo appears on the phone screen.]

I have done that. The iPhone should take about 30 seconds to power up, and VoiceOver should start talking as we have enabled that previously.

Adjust Volume
The iPhone has now powered up and we are now on the ‘Home’ screen. Let’s take a look at how we can adjust volume on the iPhone.

To adjust the volume, use the volume buttons, the volume up button increases the volume, and the volume down button decreases the volume. This will adjust the volume of any media that is currently playing along with VoiceOver’s volume. If you are in a call, this will adjust the call volume. Let’s give that a try.

[Demo: Hong Sen uses a one-finger swipe to the left, VoiceOver reads out the apps accordingly, then Hong Sen presses the up button and uses one finger swipe to the right, then VoiceOver increases the volume while reading out the apps. Hong Sen presses the down button and uses one finger swipe to the right, VoiceOver decreases the volume while reading out the apps.]

Activate Siri (Virtual Assistant) Let’s now take look at Siri. Siri is a virtual assistant, you can use spoken commands to perform simple tasks. To bring up Siri, press and hold on the ‘Power’ button, or the ‘Side’ button. If your Apple device has a ‘Home’ button. Use the ‘Home’ button to trigger Siri instead. Let’s give that a try.

[Demo: Hong Sen presses the ‘Power’/ ‘Side’ button, a beep sound comes along, and Siri is activated. Then followed by VoiceOver talking.]

Let’s try to ask Siri some questions.

[Demo: Hong Sen presses the ‘Power’/ ‘Side’ button, and asks, “What’s the time?” Siri announces the time accordingly. Hong Sen presses the ‘Power’/ ‘Side’ button again, and asks, “How’s the weather?” Siri tells the weather accordingly.]

Siri can also do things like enabling and disabling some features on the phone, such as turning on and off VoiceOver. Let’s try that.

[Demo: Hong Sen presses the ‘Power’/ ‘Side’ button, and says, “Turn off VoiceOver.” Siri answers, “Ok, VoiceOver is now off.” Hong Sen presses the ‘Power’/ ‘Side’ button again, and says, “Turn on VoiceOver.” Siri answers, “Ok, I’ve turned the VoiceOver on.”]

Another way to trigger Siri is with the “Hey Siri” command, where you just say “Hey Siri”, and Siri listens up for your command. This needs to be enabled either through the setup process or in ‘Settings’.

So, these are the basic functionalities of an iPhone. We have seen how an iPhone can be powered on and off, how its volume levels can be adjusted, and how to activate Siri. I hope you found this to be useful. Once again, my name is Hong Sen, and we will meet again next time.

If you would like to learn more about operating your phone, you can contact our IT trainers at Guide Dogs Singapore by calling us at 6339 7900 or emailing us at IT@guidedogs.org.sg.


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iOS

Screen Display Settings for iOS Devices

Video Duration: 13:04 minutes

This video shows you how to configure some basic screen display settings to fit your visual needs, such as invert colours, high contrast, and adjusting of font size. This video also covers the use of a magnification tool – Zoom, and how to set up short cuts for ease of access.


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Screen Display Settings for iOS Devices

Hi, I’m Dallon, I am an IT trainer at Guide Dogs Singapore. Today, I will walk you through some of the built-in accessibility features found on iOS to aid persons with low vision.

Firstly, I will be sharing on how to configure some of the screen display settings, such as ‘Invert Colours’, ‘High Contrast’, and ‘Adjusting of Font Size’. Then I’ll explain some of the settings and shortcuts for ease of access, and finally will cover a magnification tool called ‘Zoom’.

Locate ‘Settings’
To start off, let’s go to ‘Settings’. There are two different ways which you can locate ‘Settings’. The first way is to locate it manually on your ‘Home’ screen. The second way to locate ‘Settings’ is to use this feature called ‘Spotlight’. ‘Spotlight’ is a search feature, that allows you to search out anything on your phone. Do note that if you desire to use this method, you must be familiar with the keyboard layout.

To use ‘Spotlight’, ensure that you are on your ‘Home Screen’, then do a one-finger swipe down, and a keyboard should appear.
[Demo: Dallon places one finger on the ‘Home Screen’ and swipes down, then a keyboard appears at the bottom of the screen.]

Type in the application that you want, in this case, ‘Settings’, once you are done, press the ‘Go’ button. To make this simple, I’ll go to ‘Settings’ manually.
[Demo: Dallon goes back to the ‘Home Screen’ and locates ‘Settings’ manually.]

Display and Brightness
So now we are in ‘Settings’, let’s scroll down a little and locate ‘Display and Brightness’.
[Demo: Dallon scrolls down, then selects and enters into the ‘Display and Brightness’ page.]

In ‘Display and Brightness’, you can adjust the different themes, ‘Dark Theme’ and ‘Light Theme’. You can adjust your text size, and you can also adjust the different layouts, whether is Zoom, or default. And you can also perform many other things, like, adjusting of brightness.

Notice that my phone is currently in ‘Dark Theme’. So in ‘Dark Theme’, you notice that the background is black in colour, and, that the text is white in colour. Now let’s switch it to ‘Light Theme’, and see the difference.

[Demo: Dallon presses the icon labeled with the word ‘Light’ and switches from ‘Dark Theme’ to ‘Light Theme’.]

So notice that now the background is white in colour and the text is black in colour. When you adjust these themes, it will affect all the native apps and some supported apps like WhatsApp. Let’s just switch it back to dark theme for the demonstration.

[Demo: Dallon presses the icon labeled with the word ‘Dark’ and switches from ‘Light Theme’ to ‘Dark Theme’.]

Zoomed Layout
Ok, now let’s move on to look at the different display layouts that our phone can offer. So let’s just scroll down from here, look for ‘Display Zoom’, tap on it.

[Demo: Dallon locates ‘Display Zoom’ by scrolling down the page, then taps on it to enter the page.]

Over here you can see two different layouts, ‘Larger Text’, and ‘Default’. Notice that my phone is currently set to ‘Default’. So in ‘Default’, your icons are generally smaller, your text are a little bit smaller as well. Let’s click on ‘Larger Text’ and see what happens. So just tap on it,
[Demo: Dallon taps on the ‘Larger Text’ icon.]

then tap on ‘Set’ in the top right-hand corner, and then tap on ‘Use Zoom’.

[Demo: Dallon taps ‘Set’ on the top right, then followed by tapping ‘Use Zoom’ at the bottom of the phone screen.]

Notice that you will do a temporary restart, and your text will be a little bit larger. So if you go to our ‘Home’ screen,
[Demo: Dallon uses one finger to swipe up from the bottom of the phone screen and goes back to the ‘Home’ screen.]

you can see that our icons are a little bit bigger than what it was.

Visual Enhancement Features
Ok, let’s move on to explore other visual enhancement features which your phone can provide. To find these features, they are located at the ‘Accessibility Settings’ on the ‘Settings’ app. We will have to now head back to the main page of ‘Settings’. In this case, we have to locate the ‘Back’ button, which is at the top left-hand corner right below the status bar.
[Demo: Dallon locates and taps on the ‘Back’ button at the top left-hand corner.]

Press it one more time.
[Demo, Dallon presses the ‘Back’ button one more time and goes back to the ‘Settings’ page.]

And scroll down a little to look for ‘Accessibility’.
[Demo: Dallon scrolls down to locate ‘Accessibility’, and taps on it to enter the page.]

Over here, we can find various accessibility features to help aid different groups of persons with disabilities.

Display and Text Size
Let’s start off with looking at the ‘Display and Text Size’ section. Generally, this is the place where you can configure some of your vision enhancement features to further enhance the display settings to fit your visual needs. Tap on ‘Display and Text Size’.

[Demo: Dallon taps on ‘Display and Text Size’.]

On the very top, you'll see ‘Bold Text’. When you turn on this toggle, your text will be bolded, and it may be easier for you to see as it will stand out more. So let’s turn on bold text and see how it looks like.

[Demo: Dallon taps on the ‘Bold Text’ toggle, and text on the screen becomes bolded.]

To further increase the text size on your display, you can turn on ‘Larger Text’. You should turn on ‘Larger Text’ if the max size on the ‘Display and Brightness’ settings is not large enough for you. Okay, now let's tap on ‘Larger Text’.

[Demo: Dallon taps on ‘Larger Text’ and enters the page to adjust text size.]

Over here we can adjust the text size, but notice that my slider is already maximum and I still cannot really see the text very well. So to further increase our text size, we have to turn on the ‘Larger Accessibility Sizes’ toggle.

[Demo: Dallon taps on the ‘Larger Accessibility Sizes’ toggle.]

When it's turned on, I can drag the slider further to the right.
[Demo: Dallon drags the slider further to the right, text size on the screen increases.]

Increase Contrast
Another accessibility feature which I would like to bring to your attention is ‘Increase Contrast’. This could be found under the ‘Display and Text Size’ section in ‘Accessibility’. So let's just scroll down.

[Demo: Dallon scrolls down the page of ‘Display and Text Size’ and locates ‘Increase Contrast’, then turns on the toggle.]

And if we turn on ‘Increase Contrasts’, we notice that the text is sharper as it increases the contrast between the foreground and the background.

Invert Colours
In some applications where ‘Dark Theme’ is not supported, we can use this feature called ‘Invert Colours’. This feature will help you turn a lighter background to a darker background and a darker text to a lighter text. This will work best with applications with a white background and dark text.

Two different settings for ‘Invert Colours’. Firstly, we'll look at ‘Smart Invert’. It will indeed invert the colour of the display, except for things like images, some media content, and some apps with dark colour styles.

The second type is ‘Classic Invert’. ‘Classic Invert’ will just invert the entire display.

Today for ‘Smart Invert’, we will use a website for demonstration. So this website has a white background, a black text, and an image. Now let's turn on ‘Smart Invert’.

[Demo: Dallon taps on the toggle of ‘Smart Invert’, the website background changes to a darker colour.]

We can see that the colour of the website has changed. We see the background to be dark in colour and the text to be light in colour, and that the image has not changed.

Now let's turn off ‘Smart Invert’ and turn on ‘Classic Invert’.

[Demo: Dallon taps on the toggle of ‘Smart Invert’ again to turn it off, then, taps on the toggle of ‘Classic Invert’ to turn it on, and the screen colour changes.]

We can see that the whole entire display has been inverted in the sense where we see a light background and dark text.

Magnification Tool - Zoom
The next feature we looking at is a magnification feature called ‘Zoom’. This feature helps you to magnify items on your screen. For this demonstration, I have set the text size back to default so that you can see the full effect of ‘Zoom’.

In today’s video, I'll cover the basic features of ‘Zoom’. To locate ‘Zoom’, go to ‘Settings’, ‘Accessibility’, and ‘Zoom’. Right beside the text, called ‘Zoom’, you'll find a toggle which can help you to turn it on and off. To turn it on, simply just tap on it.

[Demo: Dallon taps on the toggle of ‘Zoom’, and items on the screen are magnified.]

Notice that once it's on, your screen will immediately be magnified.

To use ‘Zoom’, we're required to learn a few gestures. The first gesture that we’ll be covering, is a three-fingers double-tap gesture. This is a rapid gesture, which means you cannot stop between the gesture. Simply take three fingers and double-tap on the screen.

[Demo: Dallon performs a three- fingers double-tap gesture on the screen, and items on the screen zoomed out.]

Notice that I have zoomed out. If I repeat the gesture again, it will zoom in like a magnification screen again. Three fingers, double-tap.
[Demo: Dallon performs a three-fingers double-tap gesture on the screen again, items on the screen magnified.]

Once your screen is magnified, to move the magnification window to review more information on your screen, simply take three fingers, tap on the screen, and drag it around to review the information that you want. So I'll take three fingers, tap on the screen, and move around.

[Demo: Dallon uses three fingers to tap on the screen and moves around, items on the screen move towards the left and review more information on the right.]

I'm moving toward the left so that I can review information on the right.

[Demo: Dallon uses three fingers to tap on the screen and moves toward the right and review more information on the left.]

This is the other direction. Similarly, to review more information at the top part of the screen, we will take three fingers and tap on the screen, and then move it downwards.

[Demo: Dallon uses three fingers to tap on the screen and moves downwards to review more information on the top part of the screen.]

To review information at the bottom part of the magnification window, we will take three fingers, tap on the screen and move it upwards.

[Demo: Dallon uses three fingers to tap on the screen and moves upwards to review more information on the bottom part of the screen.]

Finally, we will look at how to change the size of the magnification window. To do this, we'll use a three-fingers double-tap gesture, but instead of letting go, we will direct upwards to zoom in and drag downwards to zoom out. Take three fingers, double-tap on the screen, and drag upwards immediately to zoom in.

[Demo: Dallon performs a three -fingers double tap gesture without letting go of his fingers and drags upwards immediately to zoom in.]

And to zoom the magnification window back down, same thing, three fingers, double tap and drag downwards immediately.
[Demo: Dallon performs a three -fingers double-tap gesture without letting go of his fingers and drags downwards immediately to zoom out.]

Accessibility Shortcut
Lastly, we'll take a look at how we can enable and disable some of the frequently used accessibility features with the use of a shortcut. To go to ‘Accessibility Shortcut’ we'll go to ‘Settings’, ‘Accessibility’, and then ‘Accessibility Shortcut’.

[Demo: Dallon selects ‘Accessibility Shortcut’ under the page of ‘Accessibility’.]

Over here we can select some of the features that we want to be triggered by the shortcut. To activate the shortcut simply press the side button three times rapidly.

[Demo: Dallon scrolls down the page of ‘Accessibility Shortcut’.]

Notice that the only feature that's been selected is ‘VoiceOver’. So now if I were to trigger a shortcut, it will turn on ‘VoiceOver’. I'll press the side button three times rapidly.

[Demo: Dallon presses the side button three times rapidly, then the phone reads out, ‘VoiceOver on’.]
So ‘VoiceOver’ is now turned on. If I do the same, press the shortcut again, it'll turn off ‘VoiceOver’.
[Demo: Dallon presses the side button again three times rapidly, then the phone reads out, ‘VoiceOver off’.]

Let's add another accessibility feature to the list of our shortcuts. Let’s select ‘Classic Invert’.

[Demo: Dallon scrolls down the page under ‘Accessibility Shortcut’, locates and selects ‘Classic Invert’.]

Notice that there will be a tick right beside it. So now if I were to press the side button, press three times rapidly, you'll notice a menu will pop up.

[Demo: Dallon presses the side button three times rapidly, then a menu pops up on the screen.]

Now if you want to activate the feature that we want, for example, ‘Classic Invert’, we just have to tap on it. Now to deactivate it, same thing, press the ‘Accessibility Shortcut’ again. So three times rapidly on the side button.

[Demo: Dallon presses the side button again three times rapidly, then a menu pops up on the screen.]

Notice that the menu pop-up, tap on the thing you want to deactivate, and it will deactivate.

[Demo: Dallon selects ‘Classic Invert’ and deactivates the shortcut.]

So we've looked at how to configure some of the visual enhancement features to fit your needs, explain some of the settings and shortcuts for ease of access. Finally, we've covered a tool called ‘Zoom’, which is a tool to magnify items on your screen. I hope you have found this video to be useful. Once again I’m Dallon. Thanks for listening and I'll see you next time.

If you would like to learn more about operating your phone, you can arrange an appointment with our IT trainers at Guide Dogs Singapore by calling 6339 7900, or email us at IT@guidedogs.org.sg.


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iOS

Basic Gestures for iPhone with VoiceOver

Video Duration: 10:38 minutes

This video showing you how to use basic finger gestures to operate your iPhone with VoiceOver enabled.


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Basic Gestures for iPhone with VoiceOver

Hi, I’m Dallon, an IT trainer from Guide Dogs Singapore. Today, I will be sharing with you some finger gestures to navigate your iPhone with the use of VoiceOver.

These finger gestures will allow you to navigate a list of items, scroll up and down a page, and activate an item.

There will be three different gestures that we are covering. The first gesture is the one-finger swipe to the left or right. The second gesture is three-fingers scrolling. And the last gesture that we will be learning is the one-finger double tap.

Enabling VoiceOver
Before we begin, let’s turn on our VoiceOver. There are two ways to turn on the VoiceOver. The first way, which is the easiest way is to use the accessibility shortcut. This is the condition if the accessibility shortcut has been set up to turn on VoiceOver, or if you have set up your iPhone with VoiceOver. To turn it on, we just need to press the side button or power button three times rapidly. You should hear “VoiceOver on”. Let’s see that in action.
[DEMO: Turning on VoiceOver by pressing the power button quickly three times. VoiceOver speaks, “VoiceOver on, Calender, Friday”]

The second way is to manually go to Settings, then to Accessibility, then to VoiceOver, and press the ‘On’ toggle.

Explore by Touch
Before we begin to explore the different finger gestures, let me share a feature that VoiceOver has, which is the ‘Explore by touch’. As I move my finger across the screen, VoiceOver will read out what is underneath my finger. For example…
[DEMO: VoiceOver reads out apps as Dallon’s finger moves across the screen]

You notice that VoiceOver read up different apps on the home screen as I was moving around. Now as I move my finger further up to the status bar of the phone, we will find information such as time and battery level. So let’s check the time.
[DEMO: Shows finger touching the top-left of the screen]
[VoiceOver reads time]

So we noticed that the time is at 5:55 pm.
And now if I move my finger to the right of the status bar, it will announce the battery level.
[DEMO: Dallon’s finger moves to the right of the status bar, ending up on the top-right of the screen]
[VoiceOver announces battery level]
Which is at 78% and it’s not charging.

One-Finger Swipe Gesture
So we have just explored the “Explore by touch” feature. So let’s move on to the finger gesture. So the first finger gesture that I’ll be talking about today is the one-finger swipe left or right. This gesture allows you to navigate between items sequentially.

To start off with our demonstration, we will be using our home screen to practice our gestures. Starting off from the status bar, which is on the left of the home screen, slightly move your finger downward to the first item on the home screen.
[DEMO: Dallon’s finger moves to the top left of the status bar, and then moves down to one of the apps on the home screen]
[VoiceOver reads out time on the upper left of the status bar, then followed by one of the apps where Dallon’s finger lands on]

Notice that the first app that was read out was ‘Calender’. Now, to perform the one-finger swipe to the right gesture, quickly flick the one-finger to the right anywhere on the home screen.
[DEMO: Dallon’s finger flick to the right]
[VoiceOver reads the next item on screen]

Notice that the next item that was read up to me was ‘Clock’. Let’s try to perform the gesture again. Remember, it’s one finger flick to the right anywhere on your home screen.
[DEMO: Dallon’s finger flick to the right]
[VoiceOver reads ‘Contacts’ on home screen]
Notice that the next item that reads out to us was ‘Contacts’.

Now, let’s move on to the next gesture. We have discovered how to move to the next item, so how do we move backwards to the previous item? Well, we just need to perform a one-finger swipe to the left gesture. It is really similar to the first gesture that we covered. So to perform this gesture, we just need to quickly flick from right to left and it’ll move to the previous item.
[DEMO: Dallon’s finger swiping from right to left on the screen]
[VoiceOver reads the item on screen]

In this case, you heard ‘Clock’. So let’s try to perform this gesture again. Same thing, one-finger flick to the left of anywhere on your home screen.
[DEMO: Dallon’s finger flick to the right]
[VoiceOver reads ‘Calender’ on home screen]

This brings us back to where we have started. Do note that these gestures that we have covered could be performed on anywhere on your phone screen. It could be performed in an app say, ‘Settings’, ‘WhatsApp’, or any app that you use, as long as you use VoiceOver.

Three-Fingers Scroll Gesture
The next pair of finger gestures we’ll be looking at is the “Three-finger scrolling gesture”. These gestures allow you to go to the next page, or to reveal more items, or information on the screen. To perform these gestures we have to place three fingers anywhere on our screen, you could either swipe left, right, up or down. For instance, if you want to go to the next page of your home screen, you have a three-finger swipe from right to left. So let’s see that in action.
[DEMO: Dallon uses a three-fingers swipe from right to left to navigate to the next screen on the home screen]
[VoiceOver announces ‘Page 2 of 4.’]
Noticed that it read, ‘page 2 of 4’. And now, the next gesture is to go to the previous page. So to go to the previous page, you just need to swipe three fingers from left to right. Let's see that in action.
[DEMO: Dallon uses three-fingers swipe to the right]
[VoiceOver announces ‘Page 1 of 4’]

Notice we are back to page 1. Depending on where you are, you can use the three-fingers to scroll up or down to perform this scrolling gesture. So for instance, you would use these gestures when you are scrolling through a list of items. In this case, we will be using ‘Settings’ for demonstration.

To perform the scrolling down gesture to reveal more information, we simply place three fingers on the screen and swipe upwards.
[DEMO: Dallon puts three fingers on the screen and swipes upwards]
[VoiceOver announces ‘Rows 20 to 35 of 58’]

Notice it says ‘Rows 20 to 35’. Let’s do the gesture one more time. Three fingers place down on the screen and swipe upwards.
[DEMO: Dallon puts three fingers on the screen and swipes upwards]
[VoiceOver announces ‘Rows 32 to 47 of 58’]

Now it says, ‘Rows 32 to 47’, this shows us that it has gone down the list. Now, how do we go back up? We will use three-fingers swipe downwards. So simply place three fingers on the screen and swipe downwards.
[DEMO: Dallon puts three fingers on the screen and swipes downwards]
[VoiceOver announces ‘Rows 20 to 35 of 58’]

Now we are back to ‘Rows 20 to 35’. Let’s see that gesture one more time. Three fingers place on the screen and swipe downwards.
[DEMO: Dallon puts three fingers on the screen and swipes downwards]
[VoiceOver announces ‘Rows 8 to 23 of 58’]
Now we are back to ‘Rows 8 to 23’.

One-Finger Double-Tap Gesture
The last gesture that we will be looking at today is the one-finger double-tap gesture. This gesture is used when you would like to activate an item. For example, opening an app. To perform this gesture, simply use one finger and tap on your phone screen twice. Do note that this is a fast gesture, which means you should not tap once and lift up your finger for too long before tapping again. Let’s try it now.

First, let’s find an item that we want to activate.
[DEMO: Dallon touching list of items on the ‘Settings’ screen]
[VoiceOver reads out items as Dallon moves his fingers]

For example, ‘General’, so let’s activate it.
[DEMO: Dallon performs a one-finger double-tap on ‘General’]
[VoiceOver reads out the activated item]

So we are currently in ‘General. Let’s try this gesture one more time. Let’s locate another item.
[DEMO: Dallon moves his finger along the list of items, and performs a one-finger double-tap on ‘Software update’]
[VoiceOver announces ‘Automatic updates’]
Notice that we are currently in Updates, we have activated ‘Software Updates’

We’ve come to the end of this video. In this video, we have covered three basic gestures. The gestures are a one-finger swipe left or right to navigate a list of items, three-fingers for scrolling, and lastly one-finger double tap to activate an item.

Once again, I am Dallon, and thanks for listening, and I’ll see you next time!

Contact Our IT Trainers
If you would like to learn more about operating your phone, you can arrange an appointment with our IT trainers at Guide Dogs Singapore by calling 6339 7900 or email us at IT@guidedogs.org.sg.


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iOS » Calling & Messaging

Adding Contact and Calling Using the Contact List (iOS Device)

Video Duration: 9:35 minutes

This video will show you how to add a contact to your contact list, how to access contact, and to make a call using the contact list on your iPhone with VoiceOver enabled.

Part of iOS Calling & Messaging series


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Video Transcript
Adding Contact and Calling Using the Contact List (iOS Device)

Hi, I’m Dallon, I am an IT trainer at Guide Dogs Singapore. Today, I’ll be showing you how to make use of your Contacts list in iOS with VoiceOver enabled. We will start off with adding a new contact to your Contacts list, showing you how to access contacts in your Contacts list, and performing functions such as making a phone call.

Accessing the Phone’s Contacts
Today I'll be using the iPhone 13 for demonstration. We'll be looking at how we can add contacts to our phones. There are two different ways you can access your contacts. The first way is through the ‘Phone’ app and under the Contacts tab, and the second way is using the ‘Contacts’ app on your phone. Over here, we have the ‘Phone’ app opened. We are currently on the ‘Contacts’ tab.

[Demo: Dallon shows the phone screen with the ‘Phone’ app opens with the ‘Contacts tab’.]

The ‘Contacts’ icon is a third icon located in the navigation tab bar.

Add a New Contact
Now we will be adding a new contact to our Contact list. To do that, we have to locate the ‘Add’ button, which could be found on the top right hand of the screen, right below the status bar. You can either use your one-finger swipe gestures, or your ‘Explore-by-touch’ to locate it.

[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘Add’ button; VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

When you find the ‘Add’ button, you can do a one-finger double-tap gesture to activate.

[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger double-tap gesture to activate the ‘Add’ button; VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

Noticed that it is currently focused on a ‘Text Field’ – ‘First Name’ in the Contact Creation Screen. The Contact Creation Screen contains fields such as your ‘First Name’, ‘Last Name’, and ‘Add Phone Number’, and more. Minimally, you have to fill up your ‘First Name’, and your ‘Phone Number’, or an ‘Email Address’. Notice that the keyboard is opened on the bottom half of the phone screen. That is because the ‘First Name’ field has been selected. We’ll first start by entering in the ‘First Name’ and the ‘Phone Number’ fields.

To type on the keyboard, we’ll first place our finger at the bottom half of the phone screen where the keyboard is located. We will locate the key that we want, and where we want to tap on the key, we will do a one-finger double-tap gesture to activate it. Do note that the typing mode is currently set to standard typing as it is the default typing mode when VoiceOver is enabled.

Let's fill in the ‘First Name’. First, I'll look at the letter ‘D’, because I'll be typing my name.

[Demo: Dallon locates the letter ‘D’ on the keyboard; VoiceOver reads out the letters as he browses until ‘Delta’ is read out.]

When I want to key in this letter, I'll do a one-finger double-tap gesture.
[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger double-tap gesture on the letter ‘D’; VoiceOver reads accordingly.]

I'll continue to type the rest of the letters in my name.

[Demo: Dallon types out letters for his name; VoiceOver reads out the letters accordingly.]

Now let's just first check if our ‘ First Name’ has been entered in correctly. We can use the ‘Explore-by-touch’ to locate the ‘First Name’ field.

[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘First Name’s field. VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

Noticed that it has read out my name. Next, we’ll add a phone number, and to do that we will have to locate the ‘Add Phone’ button. From where we are, we can use the one-finger swipe right gesture to locate it.

[Demo: Dallon performs a few times one-finger swipe right gestures to locate the ‘Add Phone’ button. VoiceOver reads out accordingly until it says the ‘Add Phone’ button.]

So we have located the ‘Add Phone’ button. We'll use a one-finger double-tap gesture to activate it.

[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger double-tap gesture to activate the ‘Add Phone’ button. VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

Notice that the ‘Keyboard’ has been replaced with a ‘Keypad’. This is similar to a phone-style keypad. Let's key in the phone number.

[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘Keypad’; VoiceOver reads out accordingly]

Same thing. Find the number that you want, and to perform a one-finger double-tap gesture to activate.

[Demo: Dallon keying in a phone number; VoiceOver reads out the numbers accordingly.]

So we have successfully entered in the phone number. The next thing that we can do is to actually select the type of phone number this is. Right beside the ‘Phone Number’s ‘Text Field’, we can actually find a button that states ‘Mobile’ at the moment.

[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘Text Field’; VoiceOver reads accordingly.]

So on the left of this, we’ll find the button that states ‘Mobile’.

[Demo: Dallon locates the button that states ‘Mobile’; VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

So to activate this button, we will just do a one-finger double-tap. This will bring up the different types that are available.

[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger double-tap gesture, and a list of phone types appears; VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

So over here we can select things like ‘Home’, ‘Work’, or ‘School’, or even ‘Others’. For now, we will just leave this as ‘Mobile’.

[Demo: Dallon locates ‘Mobile’ and performs a one-finger double-tap gesture to select; VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

You don't have to change it if you like to leave it as default. Now we can proceed to save this contact and to do that we have to locate the ‘Done’ button which could be found on the top right-hand corner of the phone screen right below the status bar.

You can either use your one-finger swipe to the left gesture from where we are to locate for the ‘Done’ button or to use your ‘Explorer-by-touch’.

[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘Done’ button; VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

Once you hear the ‘Done’ button, do a one-finger double-tap gesture.

[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger double-tap gesture to select; VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

We have successfully created our contact name ‘Dallon’.

Accessing the Contact List and Making a Call
From where we are, to view the list of contacts that we have on our phone, we have to look for the ‘Back’ button which could be found on the top left-hand corner of the screen, right below the status bar.
[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘Back’ button and performs a one-finger double-tap gesture to return to the previous page; VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

Over here you can see a list of contacts on my phone. If you have a long list of contacts, you can use your three-fingers scrolling gesture to bring it down to the next page.
To locate each of the contacts, you could use your one-finger swipe gestures or the ‘Explore-by touch’ to search for the contact that you want. The other way is to use a search function to locate for the contact that you want. The search function could be found on the top right below the heading contacts. For now, I'll use the ‘Explore-by-touch’ method to look for the contact that I want to call.

[Demo: Dallon uses ‘Explore-by-touch’ to locate the contact that he wants to call; VoiceOver reads out names accordingly.]

To go into the contact, to review more information of this person, just do a one-finger double-tap.

[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger double-tap gesture to select the contact ‘Dallon’ and enters the page for more information; VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

Over here, apart from seeing contact information about the person, we can also locate the function such as ‘Message’ or ‘Call’. We can either use our ‘Explore-by-touch’ to find it or one-finger swipe gesture.

[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger swipe gesture to locate the ‘Call’ button; VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

When we double tap on this ‘Call’ button, a menu will pop up to select the different ways you could call the person. Could be through WhatsApp, or if you have other apps, you may see it over here. So let's just press the ‘Call’ button.

[Demo: Dallon locates and selects the ‘Call’ button; VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

So you can see ‘Mobile’.
[Demo: Dallon continues to locate other calls option; VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

We can also see WhatsApp. So let's just select ‘Mobile’.

[Demo: Dallon selects ‘Mobile’; VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

When we double-tap on this, it will proceed to make the call.

[Demo: Dallon double-taps on ‘Mobile’ to make a call. The phone makes a call to the contact.]

Do remember if you want to end the call, you'll do a two-fingers double tap.

[Demo: Dallon performs and two-fingers double-tap to end the call.]

So now the call has ended.

We have taken a look at adding contacts and making a phone call with the use of your contacts list. I hope you have found this video useful. Once again, I’m Dallon, thanks for listening and I'll see you next time.

If you would like to learn more about operating your phone, you can arrange an appointment with our IT trainers at Guide Dogs Singapore by calling 6339 7900 or email us at IT@guidedogs.org.sg.


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iOS » Calling & Messaging

Make and Receive Phone Calls (iOS Device)

Video Duration: 5:45 minutes

This video will first show you how to answer and end calls on an iPhone with VoiceOver enabled, then followed by making a call by dialing a number with the phone’s ‘Dialpad’.

Part of iOS Calling & Messaging series


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Make and Receive Phone Calls (iOS Device)

Hi, my name is Dallon, I am an IT trainer at Guide Dogs Singapore. Today, I’ll be showing you how to make and receive calls on iOS with VoiceOver enabled.

We will first try to answer and end a call with the use of VoiceOver, followed by using your ‘Dialpad’ on your ‘Phone’’s app to make a phone call.

Answering and Ending Calls with VoiceOver Enabled
Today, we'll be using the iPhone 13 for demonstration. We'll be looking at how we can pick up and end a call with the use of VoiceOver. We’ll be receiving a call shortly.

[Demo: The phone receives an incoming call; VoiceOver announces it accordingly.]

Notice we have received a call. To pick up the call, you'll use a two-finger double-tap gesture.

[Demo: Dallon performs the two-finger double-tap gesture on the screen to answer the phone call.]

So the call has just been picked up. Once you've done with your conversation, to end the call, use the same gesture – two fingers double-tap.

[Demo: Dallon performs a two-fingers double-tap gesture to end the call.]

The call has ended.

Making a Phone Call through ‘Dialpad’ (Keypad)
So we have just looked at how we can pick up and end a call with the use of VoiceOver. Next, we'll be looking at how we can use the ‘Phone’’s app ‘Dialpad’ to make a call.

Now let's first look at the ‘Phone’ app, which can be found on your ‘Home’ screen at a ‘Dock’ section.

[Demo: Dallon finds the ‘Phone’ app in the ‘Dock’ section, which is located at the bottom part of the phone screen. VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

To open the app do a double-tap gesture.

[Demo: Dallon performs a double-tap gesture to open the ‘Phone’ app.]

And now we are in the ‘Phone’ app. The app is mainly broken up into two different sections. Mainly the navigation tap bar, and the main area. The navigation tap bar consists of 5 different icons, from the left-hand side, we will see ‘Favorites’.

[Demo: Dallon browses the navigation tap bar, VoiceOver reads out items accordingly.]

Moving to the right we will see ‘Recents’.

[Demo: Dallon continues to browse the navigation tap bar until VoiceOver reads out ‘Recents’.]

And so on.

To make a call using the phone’s keypad. We have to bring up the ‘Keypad’, which is the fourth icon on the navigation tap bar.

[Demo: Dallon browses the navigation tap bar until VoiceOver reads out ‘Keypad’.]

When we hear that, just do a double-tap gesture to open it.

[Demo: Dallon performs a double-tap gesture to open the ‘Keypad’.]

Now we are on the ‘Keypad’. The ‘Keypad’ that’s currently present on the screen, is generally the same as your landline telephone’s ‘Dialpad’. It is layout in a matrix of 3 columns and 4 rows. The first row being 1, 2, 3, and the second row being 4, 5, 6, and so on.

Right above the ‘Keypad’ you’ll find the ‘Add Number’ button. And right above that you’ll find the ‘Text Box’, where the number will be keyed in. Right below the ‘Hash Key’, you’ll find the ‘Delete’ button, right below the ‘Zero’, you’ll find a ‘Call’ button. Do note that the ‘Delete’ and ‘Add Number’ buttons will only appear if a number is being keyed in.

Let’s proceed to dial a number. Let’s gently place our finger on any part of the phone screen where the keypad is and locate the number ‘8’.

[Demo: Dallon locates the number ‘8’, and VoiceOver reads out the number accordingly.]

To activate a number, we will do a one-finger double-tap gesture. Let’s proceed to continue to type the rest of the other numbers.

[Demo: Dallon continues to key in the rest of the numbers, and VoiceOver reads out the numbers accordingly.]

To check if the number has been entered correctly, we will tap on the ‘Edit Box’, which is right above the ‘Add Number’ button.

[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘Add Number’ button and then moves up to locate ‘Edit Box’, VoiceOver reads out the numbers that just entered in – 80232952.]

Sounds like the number has been entered in correctly. So to make the call, we will press the ‘Call’ button, which is right below the ‘Zero’ key.

We will double-tap with one finger to make the call.
[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘Call’ button, and VoiceOver reads out the ‘Call’ button. Then Dallon performs a one-finger double-tap gesture to make a call.]

Notice that our call has gone through, and the person has just picked up my call. Once you’re done with the conversation, to end the call, do a two-finger double-tap.

[Demo: Dallon performs a two-finger double-tap gesture to end the call]

And the call has ended.

So we have seen how to make and receive calls with the use of VoiceOver. I hope you found this video to be useful. There’s another popular method to make a phone call, which is through the use of WhatsApp, which we will cover in the next phase. In the meantime, if you have any queries in regarding to use WhatsApp, feel free to contact GDS for support.

Once again, I’m Dallon, thanks for listening and I’ll see you next time.
If you would like to learn more about operating your phone, you can arrange an appointment with our IT trainers at Guide Dogs Singapore by calling 6339 7900 or email us at IT@guidedogs.org.sg.


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iOS » Calling & Messaging

Sending and Receiving Messages (iOS Device)

Video Duration: 10:26 minutes

This video will show you how to send and read messages on iOS device with VoiceOver enabled. The video will first show you how to browse through and read messages with the default ‘Messages’ app, and then followed by sending a text message.

Part of iOS Calling & Messaging series


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Sending and Receiving Messages (iOS Device)

Hi, I am Dallon, an IT trainer from Guide Dogs Singapore. Today I'll be showing you how to send and read messages with VoiceOver enabled.

Reading messages on a default ‘Messages’ app
Today, we'll be using the iPhone 13 for demonstration. We'll be looking at how we can send and receive messages using the default ‘Messages’ app on the iPhone. Over here we have the ‘Messages’ app opened.

[Demo: Dallon shows the phone screen with the ‘Messages’ app opened.]

At the top of the screen right below the messages heading, you can find a search field for you to search for a specific conversation that you want to find. Below that, you have a list of conversations of people whom you have previously messaged. Do note that this is sort from the most recent conversation being at the top. At the top right-hand corner of the screen, right below the status bar, you can find a ‘Compose’ button. This button is used when you want to create a new conversation.

And now we will want to select a person whom we want to chat with. Let's start off with continuing our conversation with my dear friend Lionel. To do that, we have to locate his name in the list of conversations. So I'll use ‘Explore-by-touch’. I'll just place one finger gently on the screen and drag it around until I find Lionel's name.

[Demo: Dallon uses ‘Explore-by-touch’ to locate Lionel’s name in the conversation list. VoiceOver reads out names while Dallon is searching for Lionel’s name.]

So I'll go into his chat to see the list of messages.

[Demo: Conversation with Lionel is found. Dallon selects the chat with Lionel to read the messages.]

Once we are in his chat, we will be presented with this screen. At the top, we will be able to find the name of the person. So in this case is Lionel.

[Demo: Dallon taps on the top of the screen, and VoiceOver reads out the name ‘Lionel’.]

Right below that, you'll have the messages that we previously had. On the bottom part of the screen, we will find functions such as ‘Photos’, ‘Stores’, ‘Videos’… but right above that, most importantly is the ‘Edit Box’. This is where we can reply or send a new message. To locate the ‘Edit Box’, place one finger down on the screen, at the bottom left, where the ‘Dock’ area is.

[Demo: Dallon places one finger down on the screen and searches for ‘Edit Box’. VoiceOver reads out items accordingly: ‘Apps’, ‘Photos’, ‘Message’, ‘Apps’, ‘Photos’… button…]

You'll hear ‘Apps’, ‘Photos’… I'm going to move up a bit and you can hear ‘Camera’.
[Demo: Dallon moves his finger up on the screen, VoiceOver reads out ‘Camera’…]

We can use this as a landmark to go to the ‘Edit Box’. I'll use a one-finger swipe right gesture two times and I'll reach the message ‘Text Field’.

[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger swipe to the right gesture two times, VoiceOver reads out: ‘Text Messages’, ‘Text Field’…]

This is where the ‘Edit Box’ is. On the right of that, you'll find the ‘Send’ button.
Do note that the ‘Send’ button will only appear if you have text in the text box. For now, if you swipe towards to the right-hand side, you'll find a ‘Dictate’ button instead.

[Demo: Dallon taps on the ‘Dictate’ button, and VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

So now, if you like to see the most recent message, what you could do is first locate the ‘Camera’ button. It’s like a landmark. It is located at the bottom left-hand side where the ‘Dock’ area is.

[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘Camera’ button. VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

So from ‘Camera’, you perform a one-finger swipe to the left gesture.
[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger swipe to the left gesture after locating the ‘Camera’ button. VoiceOver reads out the message that Lionel last sent to Dallon.]

Here we can see the last message that was sent by Lionel. To read the message that was sent before this, we will perform a one-finger swipe left gesture.

[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger swipe to the left gesture; VoiceOver reads out the message last sent by Dallon to Lionel.]

This is a message sent by me to Lionel. So to read the message after again, we do a one-finger swipe right gesture.

[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger swipe to the right gesture; VoiceOver reads out the message that Lionel last sent to Dallon again.]

Sending Messages on a Default ‘Messages’ App
So we have looked at how we can read the list of messages. Now, let's proceed to reply or send a message to Lionel. To do that, let's locate the ‘Edit Box’ and then perform a one-finger double-tap gesture.

[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘Edit Box’ by browsing around the phone screen until VoiceOver reads out ‘Text Field’.]

So one-finger double-tap.

[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger double-tap gesture on ‘Text Field’, then the keyboard appears.]

Notice that the keyboard will be opened up on the bottom half of the screen. When we want to type a particular letter, we will look for it and once we want to type the key, we will just do a one-finger double-tap to activate it. So I'll be looking for the letter ‘I’.

[Demo: Dallon browses over the keyboard and looks for the letter ‘I’. VoiceOver reads out the letters where Dallon’s finger landed until he finds the letter ‘I’]

One-finger double tap.

[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger double tap gesture once he finds the letter ‘I’.]

I proceed on to type rest of the message.

[Demo: Dallon continues to key in letters to finish typing in the message in the ‘Text Field’. VoiceOver reads out the letters accordingly.]

Once you are done typing a message, you can proceed to press the ‘Send’ button, which is on the right-hand side of the ‘Edit Box’.

[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘Edit Box’, VoiceOver reads out the message that he just typed in – ‘I will be late’.]

Do note that when I tap my finger on the ‘Edit Box’, it’ll read out the message that I have typed. This is how you can check if your message is correct.

[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘Send’ button. VoiceOver reads out where Dallon’s finger landed until it reads out the ‘Send’ button.]

When I find the ‘Send ‘button, I'll do a one-finger double-tap to send out the message.

[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger double-tap gesture on the ‘Send’ button to send out the message. VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

And now the message has been sent.

Moving on, we'll be looking at how we can send a new message to a new contact. From where we are now, we need to go back to the ‘Messages’ app’s main screen. To do that, we have to locate the ‘Back’ button, which can be found on the top left-hand side of the screen, right below the status bar.

[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘Back’ button, and VoiceOver reads out accordingly until it reads out the ‘Back’ button.]

We can perform a one-finger double-tap to go back.

[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger double-tap gesture on the ‘Back’ button to return to the ‘Messages’ app’s main screen.]

So now we are on the main screen of the ‘Messages’ app. On the main screen, we will now locate the ‘Compose’ button, which is on the top right-hand side of the screen, right below the status bar. Once you find it, use a one-finger double-tap gesture to activate it.

[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘Compose’ button. VoiceOver reads out accordingly until he finds the ‘Compose’ button. Then he performs a one-finger double-tap gesture on the ‘Compose’ button once he finds it and enters the page.]

Notice that we are focused on the ‘To: Text Field’. Over here, you can enter in a name in your contacts list, or a phone number of a person whom you wish to start a new conversation with. I will start by entering in a name. On the bottom half of the screen. You'll find the keyboard. So I'm going to locate for a letter. In this case, I'll look for ‘D’.

[Demo: Dallon finds the letter ‘D’, VoiceOver reads out accordingly until it says ‘D, Delta’.]

To activate the letter, do a one-finger double-tap.

[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger double-tap on the letter ‘D’ to activate it. VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

I’ll proceed on to type the rest of the name.

[Demo: Dallon proceeds to type the rest of the letters for the name he is looking for. VoiceOver reads out the letters accordingly.]

Once you are done typing the name, proceed to press the ‘Return’ button on the bottom right-hand side of the keyboard.

[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘Return’ button on the bottom right hand of the keyboard, VoiceOver reads out accordingly until it says ‘Return’ button, then performs a one-finger double-tap on it.]

Now you have to locate the ‘Edit Box’. The ‘Edit Box’ is found in the middle of the screen right above the keyboard.

[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘Edit Box’, VoiceOver reads out accordingly until it says ‘Text Field’ button, then performs a one-finger double-tap on it.]

Once we hear ‘Message’, ‘Text Message’, ‘Text Field’, we can use a one-finger double-tap gesture to activate it.

[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger double-tap gesture to activate it, and VoiceOver reads out accordingly.]

We can proceed to now type a short message.

[Demo: Dallon types a short message, VoiceOver reads out accordingly as he is typing.]

To check if we have entered in the message correctly, we could locate the message ‘Edit Box’ and VoiceOver will read out the text again.

[Demo: Dallon locates the ‘Edit Box’, VoiceOver reads out the text that he just typed in, which is ‘Hello’.]

So it sounds like the message is correct. So to send this message, we will press the ‘Send’ button, which is located on the right of the ‘Edit Box’.

[Demo: Dallon located the ‘Send’ button, VoiceOver reads out accordingly until it says, ‘Send’ button.]

So we are just performing one-finger double-tap to activate.

[Demo: Dallon performs a one-finger double-tap gesture to activate the ‘Send’ button.]

The message has been sent.

We have learned how to send and receive messages using the default ‘Messages’ app. I hope you have found this video useful. There's another popular app for instant messaging, which is ‘WhatsApp’. We'll cover this in the next phase. In the meantime, if you have any queries regarding the use of WhatsApp’, feel free to contact GDS for support. Once again, I’m Dallon, thanks for listening, and I’ll see you next time.

If you would like to learn more about operating your phone, you can arrange an appointment with our IT trainers at Guide Dogs Singapore by calling 6339 7900 or email us at IT@guidedogs.org.sg.


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